Popeye


by

Tuesday, November 18, 2008



This one’s for Dustin Harbin.

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7 Responses to “Popeye”
  1. Dustin Harbin says:

    You’re a good guy Frank. I want to have you over for a duck dinner.

  2. Frank Santoro says:

    love it!
    love it!

    glad to have you back, D.

  3. ULAND says:

    Hey I just posted a short interview with Frederic Fluery on my new TOP DRAWER blog.
    I thought readers of COMICSCOMICS might wanna check it out!

    http://10drawerquestions.blogspot.com

    Thanks.

  4. Anonymous says:

    you gotta soda on your roof!

  5. Anonymous says:

    can someone explain this joke to me?

  6. Frank Santoro says:

    sure. There was/ is a band from pittsburgh called “Don Caballero”. Math-Rock pioneers. Unbelievable drummer. The drummer, Damon, was once at a gas station filling up his Isuzu Trooper (remember those?) and he left his Big Gulp diet coke on the roof of his car as he pulled out of the gas station. He was listening to some crazy loud music and was in a good mood, full of good cheer, tryin’ to be slick. An elderly gentleman (old cool cat) walking down the sidewalk spied the impending disaster and said in his gravely smoker voice “you gotta soda on yer roof”. But Damon didn’t hear him and replied “What?” So the cool old cat said again “you gotta soda on yer roof!” “what?” “you gotta soda on your roof!……..(long pause)…asshole”

    Then somehow that phrase became a sort of pittsburgh put down of someone, anyone when they’re “tryin’ to be slick”. It’s funny to my friends here. And I think the guy(s) that write this means it in good humor. I think it’s funny, anyhow.

  7. Frank Santoro says:

    but more importantly:

    “It’s the alchemy of Segar’s dialogue—how the “exposition” does all the tedious work for him, how it sets the scene with very believable, individual voices—and the solid characterization defined by his lines that is so breathtaking”

    My friend Mike (who plays music) also just pointed out to me that the page, the six daily strips piled on top of each other and the “black spotting” of shadows on the repeated characters LOOKS LIKE SHEET MUSIC. hunh. It does actually, and more, I think, than most cartoonists cuz Segar so squarely nails things into place panel after panel. A perfect on model new pose of the figure each frame like a note going up and down the scale.